New Zealand

Car guide slams safety regulations

Tradesmen are treated as second-class citizens as far as road safety is concerned, says the car buyers’ Dog & Lemon Guide.

Editor Clive Matthew-Wilson was commenting after Chinese-made Great Wall utes were shown to be very unsafe in Australian crashtests.

‘Safer Journeys’ document misses the point

The government’s ‘Safer Journeys’ discussion document, which seeks public consultation on road safety issues, is mainly a repeat of the failed policies of the past, says the car buyers’ Dog & Lemon Guide.

Editor Clive Matthew-Wilson says the document focuses mainly on changing driver behaviour, while missing out on proven road safety strategies.

Warning over diesel vehicles

Small diesel cars are not the bargain they appear to be, says the car buyers’ Dog & Lemon Guide. Editor Clive Matthew-Wilson says:

Car Guide Slams Chinese Vehicles

The first Chinese-made vehicles to arrive in Australasia have been savaged in a review by the car buyers’ Dog & Lemon Guide, which describes them as: “a clumsy and unsafe copy of several existing Japanese vehicles.”The review slams the Great Wall SA220 and V240 utes on virtually all fronts, including appearance, safety, performance, fuel economy and handling.Editor Clive Matthew-Wilson – whose road safety research was awarded by the Australian Police Journal – adds:

“One of the reasons these vehicles are so cheap is that many vital safety features have been simply left off in an

ACC Changes Would Penalize Poor People

Proposals to make owners of older, less safe, cars pay more in ACC levies than those in newer, safer, cars, will simply penalise the poor, says the car buyer’s Dog & Lemon Guide.

Editor Clive Matthew-Wilson says:

“Poor people buy old cars because they have little money. Penalising poor people for having little money is something that only someone in Treasury could dream up.”

Motorists robbed by trucking plans

The trucking industry is effectively being subsidised by other road users, says the car buyers’ Dog & Lemon Guide.

Commenting after the government announced plans to allow trucks of up to 50 tonnes on public roads, Dog & Lemon Guide editor Clive Matthew-Wilson says:

“The government’s transport strategy is being driven by trucking industry lobbyists, and the average motorist is the loser.”

Expert Calls For Prosecutions over Unsafe Commercial Vehicles

The Department of Labour should prosecute employers who make workers use unsafe vehicles, says the car buyer’s Dog & Lemon Guide.

Editor Clive Matthew-Wilson says:

“The law is quite clear: employers are required to provide a safe workplace and can be prosecuted if they don’t.”

“Legally, a motor vehicle is a workplace, yet the Department of Labour appears to be taking no action against employers who put their workers at risk by making them drive unsafe vehicles.”

Government needs to rethink road safety strategy

The weekend road toll should serve as a wakeup call to the government, says the car buyers’ Dog & Lemon Guide

Editor Clive Matthew-Wilson says New Zealand’s road safety authorities have largely wasted road safety resources by targeting all drivers instead of drivers within the seven riskiest groups.

Car safety expert backs plan to raise drinking age

One of New Zealand’s leading road safety experts backs proposals to raise the drinking age, as part of a package of measures aimed at easing the damage caused by alcohol.

Clive Matthew-Wilson, editor of the car buyer’s Dog & Lemon Guide, says:

“The rise in youth drinking is mainly the result of younger people having easier access to alcohol. The only real way to reverse youth drinking is to restrict youths’ access to alcohol. It’s that simple.”

Australian car assembly industry doomed

Australia’s car assembly industry will not survive the economic recession, and Holden will probably be the first to go, says the car buyers’ Dog & Lemon Guide.

Editor Clive Matthew-Wilson said today:

“Holden’s owner, General Motors, is teetering on the edge of bankruptcy. The U.S. government will rescue the parent company in order to protect American jobs, but there’s no way the American government is going to rescue Australian jobs.”