Safety

Macfarlane lying over used Japanese cars, says expert

Claims that allowing used Japanese cars into Australia would reduce road safety are simply nonsense, says the car review website dogandlemon.com.

Editor Clive Matthew-Wilson, who has extensively studied the New Zealand experience with used imports, says:

“Used Japanese imports were the best thing that ever happened to the New Zealand consumer.”

“In the late 1980s, New Zealanders went from driving rusty old death-traps to driving relatively modern cars. Now, with about half the New Zealand fleet coming second-hand from Japan, New Zealanders wouldn’t have it any other way.”

Government inaction killing innocent motorists, says safety campaigner

Innocent people are dying due to long delays in installing centre lane barriers on high risk roads, says an outspoken road safety campaigner.

Speaking after yet another fatal accident on SH2 at Kaitoke, where a car crossed the centre line and collided with an oncoming vehicle, Clive Matthew-Wilson says:

"Most of these collisions are easily preventable by the centre median barriers, which are both cheap and easy to install."

Safety campaigner backs alcohol levy

A prominent road safety campaigner has backed a call by the AA for an alcohol levy to help pay for the cost of alcohol-related injuries.

Clive Matthew-Wilson, editor of the car review website dogandlemon.com, says:

“Multiple studies have shown that alcohol consumption by high risk groups can be reduced by raising the cost.”

FBI urges end to police chases

Police chases for traffic violations are dangerous and generally unnecessary, says the American Federal Bureau of Investigation.

A 2010 FBI report says breaking off the pursuit of a fleeing vehicle has very few negative consequences for crime-fighting.

Multiple studies, quoted by the FBI, show that once suspects realise they're no longer being chased, they tend to slow down to normal driving speeds and therefore become far less of a risk.

Poverty driving road deaths

Many road accidents are the result of simple poverty, says the car review website dogandlemon.com.

Editor Clive Matthew-Wilson, whose road safety research was awarded by the Australian Police Journal, says most road safety messages don’t get through to the highest risk groups.

Horrifying statistics prompt call for action over vehicle cellphone use

The use of cellphones is now a major cause of traffic accidents, and it’s time to get tough about it, says the car review website dogandlemon.com.

The American National Safety Council estimates 26% of all traffic crashes involve drivers using cellphones.

Tourists should be required to sit an online driving test – safety campaigner

The government should ban overseas travellers from renting cars until they have first passed an online driving test, says the car review website dogandlemon.com.

Editor Clive Matthew-Wilson, who is an active road safety campaigner, says:

“There have been multiple accidents caused by foreign drivers who are utterly unaware of what they should be doing on our roads.”

“The International Driver’s Licence scheme works for people from countries that have similar roads and training. It certainly doesn’t work for many drivers from developing countries.”

Technology the key to lowering road toll – safety campaigner

The government must take responsibility for the road toll, says the car review website dogandlemon.com.

Editor Clive Matthew-Wilson, who is an active road safety campaigner, says:

“The government is fixated on lowering the road toll by changing behaviour. Every credible study ever done has shown that trying to change driver behaviour is the least successful way of saving lives.”

Worst drivers think they’re the best drivers, says study

71% of young motorists think they are better-than-average drivers, according to a British survey. This is despite the fact that young people are far more likely to die on the roads.

The survey, by the online survey company visioncritical.com, on behalf of the British Institute of Advanced Motorists, showed a startling gap between perception and reality.

Government ‘hypocritical’ over legal highs, says safety campaigner

It’s hypocritical for the government to ban so-called legal highs while failing to deal with alcohol, says the car review website dogandlemon.com.

Editor Clive Matthew-Wilson, who is an active road safety campaigner, says: