Media Releases

These are the most recent media releases from the Dog and Lemon Guide.
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Car industry points to ongoing recession

The global car industry is likely to begin a second round of bankruptcies as the current economic upturn falters, says the carbuyers’ Dog & Lemon Guide.

Editor Clive Matthew-Wilson says:

“Those who optimistically see the green shoots of global economic recovery should take a look at the motor industry for a reality check. While it's nice to be optimistic, it's better to be realistic: for the last three or so years, the economic pessimists have been consistently right, while the economic optimists have been consistently wrong.

Fining motorists who run out of gas “bizarre”

A proposal to fine motorists who run out of fuel on Auckland’s motorways is both inappropriate and cruel, says the car buyers’ Dog & Lemon Guide.

Editor Clive Matthew-Wilson says:

“People generally run out of gas because they have no money. Only a politician or a policeman could come up with a bizarre scheme that fines people for being poor.”

“Auckland has an appalling public transport system, so people have no choice but to use the motorways.”

‘Safer Journeys’ document misses the point

The government’s ‘Safer Journeys’ discussion document, which seeks public consultation on road safety issues, is mainly a repeat of the failed policies of the past, says the car buyers’ Dog & Lemon Guide.

Editor Clive Matthew-Wilson says the document focuses mainly on changing driver behaviour, while missing out on proven road safety strategies.

Fines and disqualification do not reduce offending – major study.

Fines and disqualification often have little effect on driver behaviour, and may make a bad situation worse, says the car buyers’ Dog & Lemon Guide.

Matthew-Wilson was commenting after unpaid fines reached $800 million for the first time.

Cellphone ban may not work

The government’s cellphone ban won’t work unless it actually changes driver behavior, says the car buyers’ Dog & Lemon Guide.

Editor Clive Matthew-Wilson – whose road safety research was awarded by the Australian Police Journal – points to overseas research showing that teenagers, who are the most vulnerable road users – tend to ignore cellphone bans.

Warning over diesel vehicles

Small diesel cars are not the bargain they appear to be, says the car buyers’ Dog & Lemon Guide. Editor Clive Matthew-Wilson says:

Warning Over Illegal Car Dealers

Car buyers should be wary of unlicensed car dealers posing as private sellers, says the car buyer’s Dog & Lemon Guide.

Editor Clive Matthew-Wilson says: “You don’t get bargains from unlicensed car dealers. Often you’ll end up paying much the same as if you had bought the same car from a legitimate car yard, but you won’t get much protection if anything goes wrong.”

Car Guide Slams Chinese Vehicles

The first Chinese-made vehicles to arrive in Australasia have been savaged in a review by the car buyers’ Dog & Lemon Guide, which describes them as: “a clumsy and unsafe copy of several existing Japanese vehicles.”The review slams the Great Wall SA220 and V240 utes on virtually all fronts, including appearance, safety, performance, fuel economy and handling.Editor Clive Matthew-Wilson – whose road safety research was awarded by the Australian Police Journal – adds:

“One of the reasons these vehicles are so cheap is that many vital safety features have been simply left off in an

ACC Changes Would Penalize Poor People

Proposals to make owners of older, less safe, cars pay more in ACC levies than those in newer, safer, cars, will simply penalise the poor, says the car buyer’s Dog & Lemon Guide.

Editor Clive Matthew-Wilson says:

“Poor people buy old cars because they have little money. Penalising poor people for having little money is something that only someone in Treasury could dream up.”

Motorists robbed by trucking plans

The trucking industry is effectively being subsidised by other road users, says the car buyers’ Dog & Lemon Guide.

Commenting after the government announced plans to allow trucks of up to 50 tonnes on public roads, Dog & Lemon Guide editor Clive Matthew-Wilson says:

“The government’s transport strategy is being driven by trucking industry lobbyists, and the average motorist is the loser.”